About Drummers

Wise Words From Ian Paice

I just re-read a feature interview from the October 2014 issue of Modern Drummer magazine with the legendary drummer from Deep Purple, Ian Paice. He’s a huge hero of mine.

Here’s what I think is a great piece of advice for younger drummers that he shared, given his 50+ years being a professional musician in one of the iconic Rock bands of the world:

“If you like playing drums, do it because it makes you happy. If you can find a few friends around you, form a little band. If it goes somewhere else, treat it as a bonus. When we started, we never thought that it would be our careers. We were just kids having fun, and that was enough. For the few of us who had it and had the luck, it became something else. I’ve said before, success is a strange thing. You go chasing it and you won’t find it. But if you stay true to yourself and enjoy yourself and make yourself happy, you might find that success taps you on the shoulder from behind. But you can’t force it.

There are some fantastic young players around the world, and it seems that the industry’s against them. They can’t be pigoenholed; they can’t be put into little pockets of music. The industry doesn’t want to be bothered. Play what you like, play what makes you smile, play from your heart, and just keep on doing it and enjoying it. And if you never leave your garage – if your drums stay in your garage and you just batter the crap out of them – the very least you can do is make yourself smile, because you still have something that most of the world doesn’t have or understand.”

– IAN PAICE, DRUMMER FOR DEEP PURPLE, AND ROCK LEGEND.

Advertisements

Rakalam Bob Moses At The Chicago Drum Show 2008

Bob Moses is one of the most underrated legends in Jazz drumming. In this video he has one of the sweetest Ride cymbal sounds I’ve ever heard in my life. It’s so soothing like a lullaby. It’s therapeutic.

His mastery of polyrhythms and the way he layers them ]n a way that’s evocative of ancient African percussion ensembles and yet so modern sounding at the same time is astounding. Bob Moses is a musician in total connection to his past and his present.

Enjoy!

Wise Words From Vinnie Colaiuta On Developing Practice Regimens

“GC: Do you have any thoughts on a practice regiment and is it important for every drummer at some stage to practice like crazy?

Vinnie: I think that if it’s important for every drummer to have an iron clad rule at some point in his life and to practice like crazy, if we understand what “like crazy” means, I would say no. Sometimes you can get into a neurotic obsessive thing about it just because you think you have to do it rather than wanting to do it and you worry about getting to a certain level and that’s your motivating factor. Some people may argue and say what difference is your motivating factor as long as you get results. I would argue that what you’re doing when you’re in that mind set is: you’re not relaxed, you’re worried, you’re doing it for the wrong reason and you could sit there and continually repeat the wrong things and do something the wrong way for nine hours.

I think it’s just better to know that there are certain things that are beneficial to you to have certain skills developed and that it is a process. Enjoy the process and realize that if you have good form and you’re not doing anything really physiologically twisted, the way you do something technically should service your concept. Not the other way around. It should service your concept and so you should strive to conceptually understand why you’re doing something on the instrument and have your technique develop around that . Otherwise, quantitative skills are a measurable amount of speed and flexibility to an extent after which doesn’t serve a pragmatic purpose in situations. It could be a point of diminishing returns. But concept and certain things like developing a good innate sense of time, internalizing time, having good form on the instrument, having a specific kind of touch, and doing things repetitively over a time-event oriented process, you physically become physiologically comfortable with the instrument.

I think the battle is getting as good as we can as fast as we can and comparing ourselves unfavorably for the wrong reason as opposed to knowing what it is we want to do, what it is we need to do individually, and what our objective is in the musical collective.”

(Source: http://gc.guitarcenter.com/interview/colaiuta/)

Wise Words From Alex Van Halen

“Be flexible. Your time will come. If you’re really a musician, you will have your whole life in front of you to get your sound. And I think part of the fun is that whatever it is you’re reaching for, it’s always just a little bit out of reach. This not only provides the motivation, but it keeps the dream alive. If everything was perfect, what would you do?”

(Source: Modern Drummer Magazine, July 1993)

Wise Words From Elvin Jones…

 “.., a drummer can make or break a rhythm section in two seconds if he allows his ego to get the upper hand—it’s very easy, no problem at all. In one stroke, you might say, he can absolutely destroy the continuity.

“It is the duty of the drummer, I think, to take a rhythm section for what it is and not something he imagines it to be—it’s easy to destroy the simplicity of it. Rhythm is a very fundamental part of any kind of music, no matter how complex or simple it is. I think it is very simple, but then that can be a problem because it is so simple. We have to put a direction to the creative qualities we have. In a way it might seem simple, but it can be very demanding to suppress at some point the desire to go off on a tangent.”

Elvin Jones, Downbeat Magazine, 1977.

The Rumble by The Shadows

This is a killer early 60’s instrumental tune for drums by the legendary UK guitar outfit, The Shadows. Drummer on this is Tony Meehan, if I am not wrong. Either him or Brian Bennett. Just check out the independence between his ride cymbal and snare/toms. I have to play this with The High Rollers and I am already owned!

Legendary Session Drummer From UK, Bobby Graham – Bio on RootsOfRockDrumming.Com

Legendary Session Drummer From UK, Bobby Graham – Bio on RootsOfRockDrumming.Com

Just reading Bobby’s bio gave me chills. His life story is almost exactly like mine – a very shy youngster who gravitated towards drums which boosted his confidence. The drums then became an obsession for him just as it did for me. Click on title to read his bio.