jason cruz

A Masterclass Lesson With John JR Robinson

https://www.zoom-na.com/news/john-jr-robinson-zoomed

If you don’t know who he is, you’re missing out alot. Wiki on him and look at his credits, then listen to those recordings, and you immediately understand why he’s one of the most sought-after session drummers in the world for the last 40 years.

This masterclass (click on link above) gives an insight into the main ingredients that John identified and developed over the years to become one of the great musicians.

Enjoy.

Wise Words From Stewart Copeland

This instalment of “Wise Words” features an excellent quote from the game-changing Stewart Copeland, who once drummed for a mega Rock band, The Police, and is one of my all-time heroes.

Here he talks about the mechanics of playing successfully: Playing the music and not worrying about your technique or the mechanics of your instrument.

You once talked about “playing outside your instrument.” When did you come up with this idea, and can you speak about what it means to you?

“It came to me when I was playing polo – you ‘play outside your horse.’ If you’re thinking about your horse and your equestrian skills, and things like proper riding and hitting the ball, let alone playing the game and putting your horse in the right place on the field…

“See, you shouldn’t even be thinking about the horse. You have to be outside the horse. Your body and horse are one. You shouldn’t be thinking about riding. You have to think, ‘Here’s the ball. I need to get it there. I need to stop that guy from getting to the ball. Uh-oh, there’s a pass and that’s where I gotta be.’ When you do that, you’re thinking outside your horse. You’re playing the game.

“Put this to music: The mechanics of playing an instrument should be furthest from your mind. You’ve got to think outside your instrument, play outside your instrument. You’ve got to think about the music: ‘What is the music? Where are the other players are? What’s going on? Where’s the groove?’ – things like that. What drum you’re hitting, what your technique is – that should be completely subliminal.”

Complete interview at: http://www.musicradar.com/news/drums/stewart-copeland-on-the-police-drum-solos-rush-double-bass-pedals-and-more-546175

Gabriel Liew, another great student achieves distinction in Grade 7 Trinity/Guildhall Drumset exam

Every once in a while, a student comes along who is really hungry to improve in his/her craft and become a better musician. He or she sees Music as a career and not merely a hobby. That’s not to say that there’s anything wrong with viewing Music as a hobby, but Music is so much more…It’s life…

Gabriel is one such student. He listens, he practices his butt off, and he applies what he learns effectively.

So, a big congratulations to you, Gabriel. You deserve this fantastic result.

Gabriel is currently studying for a diploma in music and audio technology at the Singapore Polytechnic. He also has his own youtube channel and soundcloud page:

youtube.com/user/Gab12357

soundcloud.com/gabriel-liew.

Image of Gabriel’s exam transcript shown here with his kind permission.

 

 

New Album Out: Sunny Deo And The Ninth Order’s Mystic String

Hope your new year started off on a good footing.

It’s with great pride that I announce the release of a newalbum that I worked on between the fall of 2014 and May of 2015. It’s called Mystic String and it features a diverse set of 10 songs which run the gamut from Pop to Rock to Jazz to even abit of World Music.

Working on developing the song arrangements with the band and producer as well as recording the drum tracks are certainly two of the greatest highlights in my career so far. I learnt so much more about recording with greater precision and consistency from working with a grammy-nominated producer, Duke Purisima, who presided over the production of this album; and grammy-nominated recording and mixing engineer, Jerry Chua, who designed the sound of this album. Jerry is also a very well respected drummer, thus alot of scrutiny was naturally placed on my performances!

All in all, this album captures some of my best drumming in the studio so far in terms of creative drum parts, versatility with different styles, time, feel, and consistency. I certainly look forward to doing another album with this band and this production team.

Here’s the link to previewing the album online and purchasing it as a digital download:

http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/sunnydeoandtheninthorder.

Feel free to give me your feedback on the album!

 

 

 

TED Talk: Learning a Musical Instrument and Brain Development

http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-playing-an-instrument-benefits-your-brain-anita-collins

Old stuff but timeless information on how learning to play a musical instrument positively affects your brain.

I’ve certainly learnt so much more about myself playing the drums and that has helped me build a rather successful career overall. With the ups and downs that come along with the music business, I developed tenacity, focus, sharper intellect, better problem-solving skills, and above all versatility through my intensive study of various musical genres and their drumming styles.

Learn a musical instrument today! Take the time to find out which of these instruments resonates with you. You don’t have to aspire to be a pro, although that would be awesome.

If drums is your thing and you’ve never ever sat behind a set of drums, time to take a trial lesson. Call me at 98291901 or email me at treshombres6@gmail.com for more information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Update on Recording Projects: The Black Monolith and The Ninth Order

Hey folks,

Hope your start to 2015 was a great one. If it wasn’t, have faith, keep pushing in your chosen direction, make adjustments if necessary, believe in yourself, and things will get better as the year progresses.

I’m excited to announce that Black Monolith’s first album will be due for completion by end of March. We’ve also just done one gig for an Arts-event which was very well received. We have another gig coming up, an acoustic one, at Lasalle College Of The Arts.

I’m currently in the midst of another recording project for a Pop/Rock outfit called the Ninth Order. The band comprises:

Sunny Deo – Lead Vocals / Principal Songwriter

Kevin Mikhail – Lead Guitars

Sean Rezel – Rhythm Guitars

Bobby Chan – Keyboards

Muhammad Sultan – Bass

Yours truly – Drums, Percussion.

These guys are another great bunch to work with. Its a very relaxed and fun atmosphere – two things you need to make great music.

This project marks the first time that I’m working with an established producer. He’s none other than Mr. Duke Purisima, who’s a 2013 Grammy Nominee for his work on Arun Shenoy’s album, Rumbadoodle. It is a great honour and privilege to work with someone of those credentials, and it gives me both security and confidence in my contributions to the album. His advice helps alot in improving the drum parts and my performances that have been recorded so far have been above even my own expectations.

Watch this space for updates!!!!

To Fill-In Or Not To Fill-In??

I wanted to write this short post to address the above question that plagues the minds of many beginner drummers.

The only advice I’ll offer is this:

STEAL ideas from other drummers. Yes. STEAL. Then, over time and experience, make those ideas your own.

I am assuming you already understand the function of the fill-in and its musical purpose. Fill-Ins have to be CLEAR, IN TIME, CONFIDENT, and APPROPRIATE to the music you are playing.

Your teacher can only show you the mechanics of how to execute a fill-in. In lessons introducing fill-ins you’d go through 4 bar, 8 bar, and 16-bar exercises for this, meaning that you fill-in on the last bar of each sequence whilst you play time for the rest of the preceding bars. To play fill-ins with taste and musical purpose however is something you need to develop largely on your own over time.

The only ways to develop confidence and tastefulness in your fill-ins are by:

1) Listening to tons and tons of records and getting ideas from the drummers who played on those records. This way, you’ll gain rhythmic vocabulary, phrasing, as well as learn how different drummers approach fill-ins by way of where they put their fill-ins within the song.

As you analyse the above things, ask yourself why did these drummers phrase and put the fill-ins in places where they did. Discuss these with your teacher and your drummer friends as well. I do alot of these type of discussions with my students, and these are some of the most fun parts of teaching for me.

2) Experimenting with those fill-in ideas on the drumkit once you’ve got them transcribed (either by writing it down or by ear)

3) Over time and experience, finding variations on those fill-in ideas to make these your own ideas.

There is no other way about these above 3 steps.  Use this guideline for the rest of your entire playing career and you will reap amazing results.

If you feel you need a couple of lessons to help you get started on fill-ins, you can contact me at 98291901 or email: jason@pulseofmusic.com for more information.

Cheers and Keep Drumming!